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Welcome to the Equality & Equity Project

As part of our commitment to Anti-Racism, Diversity & Inclusion, this page will provide historical and present-day information about the contributions, challenges, culture, and daily lives of the many vital groups that make up our NSCC community, and the larger world. We will regularly highlight important facts, stories, and experiences that traditionally have been omitted from the narrative of our country, and offer steps you can take to combat inequality. This page originated in response to the urgency of Black Lives Matter, and will predominantly feature African Americans in the 2020-2021 academic year. However, this is an ongoing project that intends to honor every group in the rich fabric of NSCC life.

We invite you to visit often, reflect on what you see and read, discuss it with others and, hopefully, expand your knowledge base, appreciation, and understanding of groups beyond your own. Together we can achieve:

  • Equality (‘quality or state of being equal’), the ideal for our NSCC community, and to a larger extent, our global community.
  • Equity (‘freedom from bias or favoritism, the quality of being fair and impartial’),  the path to equality.

Example of equality vs equitycourtesy of  Artist: Angus Maguire/Interaction Institute for Social Change and Center for Story-based Strategy  

A consciously aware and understanding environment builds a stronger Comm-Unity

Deep Dives

Stories, articles or videos to build equality by demonstrating equity.

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According to a recent study, anti-Asian hate crimes have spiked 150 percent since the pandemic began. Learn more about the history of anti-Asian racism in the United States in this link to a recent Washington Post article.

Cpl. George Bushy, left, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are forced to leave Bainbridge Island, Wash., in 1942. They were sent to an internment camp. (AP)

 

Cpl. George Bushy, left, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are forced to leave Bainbridge Island, Wash., in 1942. They were sent to an internment camp. (AP)

The events of January 6, 2021, rattled the nation to its core. The extreme ideologies that led to the insurrection at the Capitol are reflective of radicalized ideological and theological perspectives that are evident in larger society and on college campuses. Within this context, this video will examine the viewpoints and historical perspectives that led to the events of January 6th. The speakers will also offer recommendations for college and university leaders on how to advocate for justice and reconciliation on our campuses and in our nation. Presented by Cora Learning. Featuring: Luke J.Wood, Lasana Hotep & Frank Harris III (1:26:00)

Keygrame of Insurrection at the Capitol video of Lasana Hotep

Neil Degrasse Tyson photo

There’s No Scientific Basis for Race—It’s a Made-Up Label

It’s been used to define and separate people for millennia. But the concept of race is not grounded in genetics.

National Geographic image of African American face overlayed with genetic codeRead the National Geographic story.

This story is part of The Race Issue, a special issue of National Geographic that explores how race defines, separates, and unites us.

Two Wolves

A Cherokee Legend

An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. “A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy.

“It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.”   He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

source

Before you call the cops on a Black person . . .

Individual racism refers to the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of individuals that support or perpetuate racism. Individual racism can be deliberate, or the individual may act to perpetuate or support racism without knowing that is what he or she is doing.

Examples:

  • Telling a racist joke, using a racial epithet, or believing in the inherent superiority of whites over other groups;
  • Avoiding people of color whom you do not know personally, but not whites whom you do not know personally (e.g., white people crossing the street to avoid a group of Latino/a young people; locking their doors when they see African American families sitting on their doorsteps in a city neighborhood; or not hiring a person of color because “something doesn’t feel right”);
  • Accepting things as they are (a form of collusion);
  • Voting without exploring a candidate's record on policies relating to equality and equity.
Tyler Merrit photo

Implicit Bias video key frame

A fictional story by Barbara Leahy (1998) where a young boy, Theo, asks his mother, “What if there were no black people?” Theo's mother walks him through the day where all the inventions and contributions that African Americans have made in US history are gone.

Read the story >

 

 Ruby Bridges and Kamala Harris montage

Think About This

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Institutional racism refers specifically to the ways in which institutional policies and practices create different outcomes for different racial groups. The institutional policies may never mention any racial group, but their effect is to create advantages for whites and oppression and disadvantage for people from groups classified as people of color.

Examples: 

  • Government policies that explicitly restricted the ability of people to get loans to buy or improve their homes in neighborhoods with high concentrations of African Americans (also known as "red-lining"). 
  • City sanitation department policies that concentrate trash transfer stations and other environmental hazards disproportionately in communities of color. 

White fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable [for white people], triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium.

A racist is one who is supporting a racist policy through their actions or interaction or expressing a racist idea. A racist idea is any idea that suggests one racial group is inferior or superior to another racial group in any way.

Individual racism refers to the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of individuals that support or perpetuate racism. Individual racism can be deliberate, or the individual may act to perpetuate or support racism without knowing that is what he or she is doing.

Examples:

  • Telling a racist joke, using a racial epithet, or believing in the inherent superiority of whites over other groups.
  • Avoiding people of color whom you do not know personally, but not whites whom you do not know personally (e.g., white people crossing the street to avoid a group of Latino/a young people.
  • locking their doors when they see African American families sitting on their doorsteps in a city neighborhood.
  • or not hiring a person of color because “something doesn’t feel right”);
    Accepting things as they are (a form of collusion).
  • Voting without exploring a candidate's record on policies relating to equality and equity.

 

Privilege is unearned social power accorded by the formal and informal institutions of society to ALL members of a dominant group (e.g. white privilege, male privilege, straight privilege, etc.). Privilege is usually invisible to those who have it, but nevertheless it puts them at an advantage over those who do not have it.

Intersectionality exposes one’s multiple identities to help clarify the ways in which a person can simultaneously experience privilege and oppression. For example, a Black woman in America does not experience gender inequalities in exactly the same way as a white woman, nor racial oppression identical to that experienced by a Black man. Each race and gender intersection produce a qualitatively distinct life.


See more glossary terms >

Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu photoFred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government's incarceration camps for Japanese Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Although a native of Oakland, CA, he was arrested, convicted, and his conviction was upheld by the US Supreme Court in 1944. Forty years later, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned and his name was cleared. However, the Supreme Court decision remained in place until it was overturned in 2018. Mr. Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life and and he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.

 

Photo of Lewis Howard LatimerBorn in Chelsea MA in 1848, Lewis Howard Latimer was an African American inventor and draftsman. Working with Alexander Graham Bell, Latimer helped draft the patent for Bell’s design of the telephone. Latimer’s deep knowledge of both patents and electrical engineering made Latimer an indispensable partner to Thomas Edison as he promoted and defended his light bulb design.

 

 

Daniel Hale WilliamsDr. Daniel Hale Williams was one of the first physicians to perform open-heart surgery in the United States. In 1891, he founded a hospital with an interracial staff in Chicago.

 

 

 

 

Alexander Miles photoAlexander Miles was an African-American inventor who is best known for being awarded a patent for an automatically opening and closing elevator door design in 1887. His design was intended to prevent people from falling into an open elevator shaft. He was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2007. 

 

 

 


See more historical figures >

 

Incarceration
Someone who is legally innocent can be put in jail because they can’t afford bail. It means that a defendant with resources can be released pre-trial, and a defendant without resources will remain in jail, based on access to money and not on how much of a flight risk they are. Write to your state legislators to end cash bail.

 

Do you know what indigenous land you’re living on?  Check out this map and research the groups that occupied that land before you did.

Native Land map

See more historical facts >

This is an example of white privilege: I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.


This is an example of white privilege:
I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race. I can talk with my mouth full and not have people put this down to my color.


This is an example of white privilege:  
I can, if I wish, arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.


See more examples of privilege >

 

We recognize the escalation in violence directed at the Asian-American community, and we stand with them in solidarity against it. Non-Asian American friends and colleagues can show support by checking in with Asian American peers, showing they’re aware of the news, demonstrating care for their wellbeing, and offering specific forms of help. However, asking someone an open-ended question like “how are you feeling?” or “is there anything I can do for you?” can create an emotional burden for the recipient in their response. Instead . . .

As a friend or classmate, you might offer your time if they want to talk, or extend a nice gesture like sending over food delivery.  Also, draw attention to anti-Asian hate and condemn it. For example, share news on social media and/or reach out to folks you know and have intentional conversations about what is happening to the Asian American community.  Make these issues widely known.

As a colleague in the workplace, you can offer to take a meeting off their plate, extend a deadline, or pitch in on a project. 

As a faculty member, make your course more inclusive and representative by including at least one course assignment that is relevant to the Asian American experience, history, cultural and/or well-being. For example, require students to read a text addressing Asian American perspectives, invite Asian American guest speakers, etc. 

As a member of the NSCC community, acknowledge and address anti-Asian hate incidents in your classes and/or meetings. 

 

Support Black businesses. Find them on WeBuyBlack, The Black Wallet, and Official Black Wall Street. Follow this link to the New York Magazine to find more black businesses.

 

Reparations isn’t just monetary. You can share your time, skills, knowledge, connections, etc. Check out the Facebook group "Reparations: Requests & Offerings."

 

Silence is support. Don’t be silent about that racist joke.

See more ways to combat inequality >

If you have any questions or comments on NSCC’s Equality & Equity Project, please contact
us at EqualityEquity@northshore.edu

Sources

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