Animated Equality & Equity logo

Welcome to the Equality & Equity Project

  • Equality (‘quality or state of being equal’), the ideal for our NSCC community, and to a larger extent, our global community.
  • Equity (‘freedom from bias or favoritism, the quality of being fair and impartial’),  the path to equality.

As part of our commitment to Anti-Racism, Diversity & Inclusion, this page will provide historical and present-day information about the contributions, challenges, culture, and daily lives of the many vital groups that make up our NSCC community, and the larger world. We will regularly highlight important facts, stories, and experiences that traditionally have been omitted from the narrative of our country, and offer steps you can take to combat inequality. This page originated in response to the urgency of Black Lives Matter, and will predominantly feature African Americans in the 2020-2021 academic year. However, this is an ongoing project that intends to honor every group in the rich fabric of NSCC life.

We invite you to visit often, reflect on what you see and read, discuss it with others and, hopefully, expand your knowledge base, appreciation, and understanding of groups beyond your own. Together we can achieve:

Example of equality versus equity versus Justice versus "?"Original artist: Courtesy of Artist: Angus Maguire/Interaction Institute for Social Change and Center for Story-based Strategy
Current update to image:
https://www. trainingfortherealworld.com/ post/when-we-can-all-buy-our- own-seat-and-popcorn

 

A consciously aware and understanding environment builds a stronger Comm-Unity.

 

Deep Dives

Stories, articles or videos to build equality by demonstrating equity.

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It is important to note that though no person alive today created the public education system, it is everyone’s responsibility to address inequities in the system, question power structures and ensure that every group (especially those who have been historically excluded) is represented and has a voice, making it more equitable for all students and families. It is also critically important to understand that the decisions made today create the public education system that impacts both current and future generations of students. To achieve an equitable system tomorrow, the work has to start today.

Learn more from the final installment in the ImpactTulsa multi-part series, Equity in Education.

August 3rd marked Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, or the day Black women had to work into 2021 to finally catch up to what white, non-Hispanic men earned in 2020. Black women worked 579 days to earn what white men did in 365.

Olympians this year made headlines not for their incredible athletic feats or victories but for the obstacles standing in their way. Athletes everywhere are calling out the sporting body for a history of banning Black women. Read more about it in this article, "The Olympics has a race problem. Athletes everywhere are calling out the sporting body for a history of banning Black women" from Business Insider.

“When I was 16, I walked into my high school counselor’s office with a list of colleges that I wanted to apply to. My mom and I stayed up all night putting it together - weighing the pros/cons of each school, figuring out what majors they had, etc. I was excited and hopeful. I sat down, handed the list over to my counselor, and after she read the first three colleges (in order: UCLA, USC, and UW), she looked up at me with a confused expression. She crumpled the paper up, threw it in the trash, and told me ‘We’re going to look for more realistic options. Shall we?’ I was speechless. For the past 10 years of my life, I had been commuting across three cities to get to school because my parents wanted me to have the best education possible.” ~ Sy Stokes, Ph.D.

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Please watch Dr. Stokes’ spoken word response to this experience in “Dear WhiteCounselor.”

Archival photo of Marsha P. JohnsonIn commemoration of The Stonewall Riots. The Stonewall Uprising began in the early hours of June 28, 1969 when New York City police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay club located in Greenwich Village. At the time, homosexual acts remained illegal in every state except Illinois, and bars and restaurants could get shut down for having gay employees or serving gay patrons. The mere gathering of homosexuals was considered "disorderly." Police raids on gay bars were common, but on that particular night, bar patrons and neighborhood residents resisted as police roughly hauled employees and patrons out of the bar. Influenced by activist Marsha P. Johnson, this led to six days of protests and violent clashes with law enforcement outside the bar on Christopher Street, in neighboring streets and in nearby Christopher Park. The Stonewall Riots launched a new era of resistance and revolution, and served as a catalyst for the gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.

Beating heart in pride colors animation

Archival photo of Native Americans at their camp.

The sacred Lakota mountain called The Six Grandfathers, was appropriated to become Mount Rushmore. Mount Rushmore's creator had ties with white supremacy groups.

 

According to a recent study, anti-Asian hate crimes have spiked 150 percent since the pandemic began. Learn more about the history of anti-Asian racism in the United States in this link to a recent Washington Post article.

Cpl. George Bushy, left, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are forced to leave Bainbridge Island, Wash., in 1942. They were sent to an internment camp. (AP)

 

Cpl. George Bushy, left, holds the youngest child of Shigeho Kitamoto, center, as she and her children are forced to leave Bainbridge Island, Wash., in 1942. They were sent to an internment camp. (AP)

The events of January 6, 2021, rattled the nation to its core. The extreme ideologies that led to the insurrection at the Capitol are reflective of radicalized ideological and theological perspectives that are evident in larger society and on college campuses. Within this context, this video will examine the viewpoints and historical perspectives that led to the events of January 6th. The speakers will also offer recommendations for college and university leaders on how to advocate for justice and reconciliation on our campuses and in our nation. Presented by Cora Learning. Featuring: Luke J.Wood, Lasana Hotep & Frank Harris III (1:26:00)

Keygrame of Insurrection at the Capitol video of Lasana Hotep

Neil Degrasse Tyson photo

There’s No Scientific Basis for Race—It’s a Made-Up Label

It’s been used to define and separate people for millennia. But the concept of race is not grounded in genetics.

National Geographic image of African American face overlayed with genetic codeRead the National Geographic story.

This story is part of The Race Issue, a special issue of National Geographic that explores how race defines, separates, and unites us.

Two Wolves

A Cherokee Legend

An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. “A fight is going on inside me,” he said to the boy.

“It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you – and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

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Before you call the cops on a Black person . . .

Individual racism refers to the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of individuals that support or perpetuate racism. Individual racism can be deliberate, or the individual may act to perpetuate or support racism without knowing that is what he or she is doing.

Examples:

  • Telling a racist joke, using a racial epithet, or believing in the inherent superiority of whites over other groups;
  • Avoiding people of color whom you do not know personally, but not whites whom you do not know personally (e.g., white people crossing the street to avoid a group of Latino/a young people; locking their doors when they see African American families sitting on their doorsteps in a city neighborhood; or not hiring a person of color because “something doesn’t feel right”);
  • Accepting things as they are (a form of collusion);
  • Voting without exploring a candidate's record on policies relating to equality and equity.
Tyler Merrit photo

Implicit Bias video key frame

A fictional story by Barbara Leahy (1998) where a young boy, Theo, asks his mother, “What if there were no black people?” Theo's mother walks him through the day where all the inventions and contributions that African Americans have made in US history are gone.

Read the story >

 

 Ruby Bridges and Kamala Harris montage

Think About This

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A CISGENDER PERSON is someone whose gender identity corresponds with the sex that person had or was identified as having at birth.       


WHITE SUPREMACY is a historically based, institutionally perpetuated system of exploitation and oppression of continents, nations and peoples of color by white peoples and nations of the European continent; for the purpose of maintaining and defending a system of wealth, power and privilege.


MULTICULTURAL COMPETENCY is the process of learning about and becoming allies with people from other cultures, thereby broadening our own understanding and ability to participate in a multicultural process. The key element to becoming more culturally competent is respect for the ways that others live in and organize the world and an openness to learn from them. 


INTERNALIZED RACISM is the situation that occurs in a racist system when a racial group oppressed by racism supports the supremacy and dominance of the dominating group by maintaining or participating in the set of attitudes, behaviors, social structures and ideologies that undergird the dominating group's power. It involves four essential and interconnected elements: Decision-making, Resources, Standards, and Naming The Problem.


INSTITUTIONAL RACISM refers specifically to the ways in which institutional policies and practices create different outcomes for different racial groups. The institutional policies may never mention any racial group, but their effect is to create advantages for whites and oppression and disadvantage for people from groups classified as people of color.

Examples: 

  • Government policies that explicitly restricted the ability of people to get loans to buy or improve their homes in neighborhoods with high concentrations of African Americans (also known as "red-lining"). 
  • City sanitation department policies that concentrate trash transfer stations and other environmental hazards disproportionately in communities of color. 

WHITE FRAGILITY is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable [for white people], triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium.


INDIVIDUAL RACISM refers to the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of individuals that support or perpetuate racism. Individual racism can be deliberate, or the individual may act to perpetuate or support racism without knowing that is what he or she is doing.

Examples:

  • Telling a racist joke, using a racial epithet, or believing in the inherent superiority of whites over other groups.
  • Avoiding people of color whom you do not know personally, but not whites whom you do not know personally (e.g., white people crossing the street to avoid a group of Latino/a young people.
  • locking their doors when they see African American families sitting on their doorsteps in a city neighborhood.
  • or not hiring a person of color because “something doesn’t feel right”);
    Accepting things as they are (a form of collusion).
  • Voting without exploring a candidate's record on policies relating to equality and equity.

See more glossary terms >

black and white portrait of Susan La Flesche PicotteSusan La Flesche Picotte was the first Native American woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, graduating from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1889. A member of the Omaha tribe, she grew up on the Omaha Reservation in northeast Nebraska, where she once watched a native woman die because the local white doctor refused to give her care. She returned to Nebraska, where she established a private practice serving both Native American and white patients. Two years before her death in 1915, she achieved her life’s dream when she opened her own hospital on the Omaha Reservation—the first hospital built on Native American land without government assistance.

 

 

George SampsonAfrican American inventor, George T. Sampson, developed and patented the country’s first automatic clothes dryer in 1892. Sampson refined an existing process with a series of suspension rods over a specially designed stove. His design was used until the growth in use of gas and electric dryers in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

 

 

 

 

Portrait of Maria Orosa in a fashionable black hatMaria Y. Orosa was a Filipino food scientist and war hero educated at the University of Washington. During WWII, she developed a soy-based powder that nourished Filipino and American prisoners in Japanese concentration camps, and a shortage of tomatoes led her to invent the enduring Filipino condiment, banana ketchup.      

 

 

Sarah Boone photoSarah Boone was an African American dressmaker who made her name by inventing the modern-day ironing board. In her patent application, she wrote that the purpose of her invention was “to produce a cheap, simple, convenient and highly effective device, particularly adapted to be used in ironing the sleeves and bodies of ladies’ garments.” With its approval in 1892, Boone became one of the first African American women to be awarded a patent.

 

Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu photoFred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Although a native of Oakland, CA, he was arrested, convicted, and his conviction was upheld by the US Supreme Court in 1944. Forty years later, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned and his name was cleared. However, the Supreme Court decision remained in place until it was overturned in 2018. Mr. Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life and and he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.

 

Photo of Lewis Howard LatimerBorn in Chelsea MA in 1848, Lewis Howard Latimer was an African American inventor and draftsman. Working with Alexander Graham Bell, Latimer helped draft the patent for Bell’s design of the telephone. Latimer’s deep knowledge of both patents and electrical engineering made Latimer an indispensable partner to Thomas Edison as he promoted and defended his light bulb design.

 

 


See more historical figures >

 

Temple Grandin

Meet scientist and industrial designer Temple Grandin, an animal welfare and autism advocate who is one of the most respected experts in both autism and animal behavior in the world. While her mother suspected that Grandin was on the spectrum when she was a teenager, Grandin was not formally diagnosed until she was in her 40s. Grandin became a fellow at the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers and won an award from PETA for advocating for more humane treatment of animals. She was also featured in the 2010 HBO film “Temple Grandin.”  

Temple Grandin sitting on red couch wearing a black and blue western shirt and pants.

 

 

Beating heart in pride colors animationAs Pride Month comes to a close, a recap: The 1969 Stonewall Uprising marked a turning point in the quest for gay rights. In 2015, the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage, but a year later, 49 people were killed and 53 were wounded in a mass shooting at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. In 2020, the US Supreme Court issued a ruling saying that Title VII of the Civil Rights act of 1964 protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination but, in 2021, extending full protections through an amendment to the Civil Rights Act, called the Equality Act, still struggles for approval in Congress.

 

Commemorated annually on June 19th, Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration of the end of slavery in the U.S. Although the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Sep. 22, 1862, after the Civil War ended in April 1865 most slaves in Texas were still unaware of their freedom. This began to change when Union troops arrived in Galveston as part of a six-week ride through Texas to spread the news. Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger read ‘General Orders No. 3’ on June 19, 1865, informing the people of Texas that “… all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves.” Freed African Americans observed “Emancipation Day,” as it was first known, as early as 1866 in Galveston.

You can learn more about the historical legacy of Juneteenth at The Smithsonian’s site: https://nmaahc.si.edu/blog- post/historical-legacy-juneteenth 

 

Junetenth flag raising animation

The Juneteenth flag will be flown this month for the first time at North Shore Community College. The flag’s symbolism includes:

  • The star burst: representing the significance of Galveston, Texas in Juneteenth, and the nova-like quality representing new beginnings for African Americans in all 50 states.
  • The curved surface indicates a horizon, a dawn of fresh opportunity and possibility for African Americans.
  • The red, white and blue represents the American flag as a reminder that enslaved people and their descendants were and are Americans.
  • The date, June 19, 1865, represents the day when enslaved black people in Galveston, Texas were told that they were free under the law, two years after the Emancipation Proclamation became official in 1863.

North Shore Junteenth Association Inc. is a group of community leaders seeking to create awareness about the Juneteenth holiday, and educate the broader community about positive aspects of African American culture. If you want to get more involved or learn more, please check out their website, https://north-shore-juneteenth-assoc.constantcontactsites.com/

 

Many companies have recruiting channels that are predominantly white. Work with your Human Resources department to recruit Americans who are descendants of enslaved Africans. Recruiting from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) is a good start.

 

Incarceration
Someone who is legally innocent can be put in jail because they can’t afford bail. It means that a defendant with resources can be released pre-trial, and a defendant without resources will remain in jail, based on access to money and not on how much of a flight risk they are. Write to your state legislators to end cash bail.

 

Do you know what indigenous land you’re living on?  Check out this map and research the groups that occupied that land before you did.

Native Land map

See more historical facts >

This is an example of cisgender privilege:
Strangers don't assume they can ask me about my genitalia or my surgical status or how much I "pass" as a non-transgender.


This is an example of white privilege:
I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared.


This is an example of white privilege:
I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us.  


This is an example of white privilege:
If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn't a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have.


This is an example of white privilege:
I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the “person in charge,” I will be facing a person of my race.         


This is an example of white privilege:
I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.


See more examples of privilege >

Be an ally. Find out how American history is taught in your local schools and whose voices and perspectives are represented. In A People’s History of the United States, historian and political scientist Howard Zinn aims to write an account of American history from the perspective of persecuted, powerless, marginalized people, instead of the usual “heroes.”

 

Be an ally. Speak up in your own social circles. You may have access to social circles that others do not. Perhaps you have heard racist, sexist, homophobic or derogatory language used by family members or friends? Take some time at your next family reunion to challenge peoples’ beliefs, and speak up for those who are not there.

 

Don't wait until October. Write to your city or town government representative to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous People’s Day like those cities in this article.

 

Seek out a diverse group of friends for your kids. And, seek out a diverse group of friends for you. Practice real friendship and intimacy by listening when POC talk about their experiences and their perspectives. They’re speaking about their pain.

 

We recognize the escalation in violence directed at the Asian-American community, and we stand with them in solidarity against it. Non-Asian American friends and colleagues can show support by checking in with Asian American peers, showing they’re aware of the news, demonstrating care for their wellbeing, and offering specific forms of help. However, asking someone an open-ended question like “how are you feeling?” or “is there anything I can do for you?” can create an emotional burden for the recipient in their response. Instead . . .

As a friend or classmate, you might offer your time if they want to talk, or extend a nice gesture like sending over food delivery. Also, draw attention to anti-Asian hate and condemn it. For example, share news on social media and/or reach out to folks you know and have intentional conversations about what is happening to the Asian American community. Make these issues widely known.

As a colleague in the workplace, you can offer to take a meeting off their plate, extend a deadline, or pitch in on a project.

As a faculty member, make your course more inclusive and representative by including at least one course assignment that is relevant to the Asian American experience, history, cultural and/or well-being. For example, require students to read a text addressing Asian American perspectives, invite Asian American guest speakers, etc.

As a member of the NSCC community, acknowledge and address anti-Asian hate incidents in your classes and/or meetings.

 

Support Black businesses. Find them on WeBuyBlack, The Black Wallet, and Official Black Wall Street. Follow this link to the New York Magazine to find more black businesses.

 

Reparations isn’t just monetary. You can share your time, skills, knowledge, connections, etc. Check out the Facebook group “Reparations: Requests & Offerings.”

 

See more ways to combat inequality >

If you have any questions or comments on NSCC’s Equality & Equity Project, please contact
us at EqualityEquity@northshore.edu

Sources

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