PRIVILEGE

/ˈpriv(ə)lij/

(noun) A special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group

 

This is an example of middle/upper class privilege:

I have visited a doctor for a “check-up.”

This is an example of cisgender privilege:

Strangers don't assume they can ask me about my genitalia or my surgical status or how much I "pass" as a non-transgender.

This is an example of white privilege:

I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared.

This is an example of white privilege:

I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us.

This is an example of white privilege:

If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn't a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have.

This is an example of white privilege:

I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the “person in charge,” I will be facing a person of my race.      

This is an example of white privilege:

I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group.

This is an example of white privilege:  

I can, if I wish, arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.

This is an example of white privilege:

I do not have to educate my children to be aware of systemic racism for their own daily physical protection.

This is an example of white privilege:  

I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race [music made by people of my race] represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser's shop and find someone who can cut my hair.

This is an example of white privilege:  

When I am told about our national heritage or about "civilization," I am shown that people of my color made it what it is.

Charlotta Bass photoHowever, this country’s history is filled with Black women who have been steadfast in their efforts to advocate for democratic rights for ALL Americans.  In 1948, Charlotta Bass, a California newspaper publisher and editor, left her 30-year allegiance to the Republican party out of exasperation over their very limited support for racial and gender inclusivity. She joined the newly created Progressive Party and, in 1952, Charlotta became the first Black woman to be nominated to the role of Vice President on any party’s national ticket.  

 

 

Photo of Shirey ChisholmIn 1968, New York Democrat Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman to win a seat in Congress.  In 1972, Congresswoman Chisholm became the first African American and the first woman to seek a major party’s nomination to run for President. She was openly anti-racist, anti-sexist, anti-war, pro-choice, and pro-labor, and she sought solutions to the chaotic issues that were plaguing the nation during that time.  Although both women were committed to their parties, party establishments did not consider either politician to be a real agent of change or the appropriate 'face' for their party. 

 


Don’t be silent about that racist joke. Silence is support. 


This is an example of white privilege: 

I can, if I wish, arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time.

If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford, and in which I would want to live. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me.

Do you know what indigenous land you’re living on?  Check out this map and research the groups that occupied that land before you did.  

 

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