Charlotta Bass photo

 

In 1948, Charlotta Bass, a California newspaper publisher and editor, left her 30-year allegiance to the Republican party out of exasperation over their very limited support for racial and gender inclusivity. She joined the newly created Progressive Party and, in 1952, Charlotta became the first Black woman to be nominated to the role of Vice President on any party’s national ticket.

 

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Sarah Boone photo

Sarah Boone was an African American dressmaker who made her name by inventing the modern-day ironing board. In her patent application, she wrote that the purpose of her invention was “to produce a cheap, simple, convenient and highly effective device, particularly adapted to be used in ironing the sleeves and bodies of ladies’ garments.” With its approval in 1892, Boone became one of the first African American women to be awarded a patent.

 

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photo of Cesar ChavezPhoto of Dolores Huerta

 

 

Mexican-American labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez raised farm laborers’ struggles for humane working conditions to the national consciousness. In 1962, along with Dolores Huerta (an activist to this day), he co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, which later merged to become the United Farm Workers labor union.

 

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Photo of Shirey Chisholm

 

In 1968, New York Democrat Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman to win a seat in Congress. In 1972, Congresswoman Chisholm became the first African American and the first woman to seek a major party’s nomination to run for President. She was openly anti-racist, anti-sexist, anti-war, pro-choice, and pro-labor, and she sought solutions to the chaotic issues that were plaguing the nation during that time. Although both women were committed to their parties, party establishments did not consider either politician to be a real agent of change or the appropriate 'face' for their part.

 

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Dr. Charles Drew photo

 

African American Charles Richard Drew’s work on the banking of blood products and the logistics of collecting and distributing blood saved countless lives in the trenches of World War II and the wards of military and civilian hospitals. Equally important to his legacy was Drew’s dedication to racial equality in segregated America, which served to inspire a nation that was striving toward justice for all.

 

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Fannie Lou Hamer

 

Fannie Lou Hamer was an African American civil rights activist. In 1964, Hamer helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, established in opposition to her state’s all-white delegation to that year's Democratic Convention and announced her bid for Congress. Although she lost the Democratic primary, she brought the civil rights struggle in Mississippi to the attention of the entire nation during a televised session at the convention.

 

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Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu photo

Fred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government's incarceration camps for Japanese Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Although a native of Oakland, CA, he was arrested, convicted, and his conviction was upheld by the US Supreme Court in 1944. Forty years later, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned and his name was cleared. However, the Supreme Court decision remained in place until it was overturned in 2018. Mr. Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life and and he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.

 

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Photo of Lewis Latimer

 

Born in Chelsea MA in 1848, Lewis Howard Latimer was an African American inventor and draftsman. Working with Alexander Graham Bell, Latimer helped draft the patent for Bell's design of the telephone. Latimer’s deep knowledge of both patents and electrical engineering made Latimer an indispensable partner to Thomas Edison as he promoted and defended his light bulb design.

 

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Alexander Miles photo

Alexander Miles was an African-American inventor who is best known for being awarded a patent for an automatically opening and closing elevator door design in 1887.  His design was intended to prevent people from falling into an open elevator shaft. He was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2007.

 

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 Photo of Garret Morgan

 

In 1923, Garrett A. Morgan created a new kind of traffic signal, one with a warning light to alert drivers that they would need to stop, after witnessing a carriage accident at a particularly problematic intersection in the city. Morgan quickly acquired patents for his traffic signal—a rudimentary version of the modern three-way traffic light.

 

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Portrait of Maria Orosa in a fashionable black hat.

 

 

Maria Y. Orosa was a Filipino food scientist and war hero educated at the University of Washington. During WWII, she developed a soy-based powder that nourished Filipino and American prisoners in Japanese concentration camps, and a shortage of tomatoes led her to invent the enduring Filipino condiment, banana ketchup.

 

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Black and white portrait of Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte

Susan La Flesche Picotte was the first Native American woman to receive a medical degree in the United States, graduating from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1889. A member of the Omaha tribe, she grew up on the Omaha Reservation in northeast Nebraska, where she once watched a native woman die because the local white doctor refused to give her care. She returned to Nebraska, where she established a private practice serving both Native American and white patients. Two years before her death in 1915, she achieved her life’s dream when she opened her own hospital on the Omaha Reservation—the first hospital built on Native American land without government assistance.

 

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George Sampson

African American inventor, George T. Sampson, developed and patented the country’ first automatic clothes dryer in 1892. Sampson refined an existing process with a series of suspension rods over a specially designed stove. His design was used until the growth in use of gas and electric dryers in the late 1930s and early 1940s.  

 

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Alan Turing

World War II codebreaker, Alan Turing, often referred to as the “father of computer science and artificial intelligence,” was hailed a British war hero for helping to defeat the Nazis. Despite this, however, he died as a disgraced “criminal” — simply for being a gay man. On June 23, 2021, what would have been his 109th birthday, the Bank of England began circulating its new £50 bank notes celebrating Turing’s life and his achievements.

 

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Madame CJ Walker

 

Born in 1867, Madam C. J. Walker was an entrepreneur. In the 20th century, she was the wealthiest African American business woman and first female self-made millionaire.

 

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Dr. Daniel Hales Williams

 

 

Dr. Daniel Hale Williams was one of the first physicians to perform open-heart surgery in the United States. In 1891, he founded a hospital with an interracial staff in Chicago.

 

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